It’s become eerily consistent: it seems the only times the Bush Administration and our media really cares about democracy, liberty and independence in the world is when there’s a lot of oil at stake. While Bush is parading around as a noble crusader for democracy, backing Georgia and hypocritically attempting to lecture Russia about the wrongs of invasion, it doesn’t hurt that Georgia also has a major oil pipeline running through it. The pipeline, which was completed in 2005, is one of the West’s latest attempts to secure its interest in the massive Caspian oil reserves, which diversifies the West’s supply of foreign oil outside of the Middle East. Also worthy of note is that the pipeline, which is controlled by BP, also shares its investment with the likes of Chevron and ConocoPhillips, as well as Norwegian, French and Italian oil giants.

Interestingly, it has been massively under-reported thus far that this conflict began, not due to a Russian invasion, but rather due to a Georgian invasion of one of its territories: South Ossetia, which is not an ethnically Georgian region and has been interested in its own independence from Georgia. While South Ossetia’s rebel forces have been fueled by Russian support– support which had recently been advanced and accelerated– undoubtedly Russia’s support for the region has more to due with the oil pipeline too, and less to do with noble protection of a region’s independence.

Thus, this is the real reason for why the U.S. and Europe are picking Georgia’s side and painting Russia as the invading force: it can only truly be about controlling that Caspian oil supply.

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