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An impactful video called “The Minature Earth” asks just that question, examining what the world would look like if we could turn the entire human population into a small community of 100 people, but keeping the same proportions we have today. Check it out here:

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guardian
An article I wrote for EcoWorldly was just syndicated by The Guardian. If you check out the front page of their ‘Environment’ section, you can find my article there under ‘Comment & Analysis’. You can link directly to the article here, titled “Japan Airlines trial biofuels on 747 flights“.

You can also check out the original article here, which was titled, “Japan Airlines’ 747 Flies More Efficiently with Biofuels than with Jet-A Fuel“.

And make sure to keep up with all of my articles over at EcoWorldly and around the Green Options Media network.

greenoptions
I just began a new job doing green journalism writing for Green Options Media, a network of environmental blogs aimed at giving green news and sustainable choices to the inner tree hugger in all of us.

I’m beginning as a writer on one of their blogs, EcoWorldly, which is part of the Guardian Environment Network, and which offers news on sustainability and ecological successes and failures from around the world, to offer advice to those with a green and innovative conscience here in America.

My first blog was just posted, and it would help out a lot if you clicked on this link and checked it out (the more hits I get, the more success I’ll have blogging there): Caterpillars Devour 45 Towns in Liberia: Climate Change Possibly to Blame.

Also, bookmark the site or subscribe to their feeds, and help me out with further posts too. I’ll be posting there pretty regularly.

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Continuing my escapades into travel writing, I’ve got a couple of articles posted over at the Australia Travel Guide at WhyGo.com.

Both of the articles are up there as features right now. One is titled “Hiking Uluru, and Why You Probably Shouldn’t“, and the other is titled Australia’s Rainforests: Daintree National Park“.

The idea behind WhyGo.com is to offer guides that go beyond just the How to‘s of travel; but to answer the Why‘s too, to inspire travel. That makes writing for them particularly enjoyable. I get to write passionately about the places and the adventures I’ve lived and loved.

For those that don’t know, I studied abroad and lived in Australia for a time, and I’ll be continuing duties at the site as a regular writer and guide for Australian travel. I’ve had an itch to get back to Oz since the day I left, but writing these articles is making it downright irresistible. Unfortunately a ticket to Sydney is just not practical right now, but at least the writing offers some consolation to my needy imagination.

Check out the articles, there will be more on the way. And wander the site for some inspiration on wherever you want to go next.

Over at pixcetera, there’s a wonderful collage of photos featuring various monkeys of the world. This got me all nostalgic about my passion for primatology.

Not too long ago, before deciding to go to graduate school for philosophy, I was actually intending to pursue my second major professionally instead– bioanthropology. I was going to become a primatologist and evolutionary scientist. As the story goes, philosophy won me over. But my passions in zoology and bioanthropology have never waned, and of course major tracks of my travels have been themed by my love of nature.

Most recently, I spent a little over a week in the Peruvian Amazon last spring– the highlight of my entire South American trip. After three and a half days on a rusty riverboat transporting goods and people down the Rio Ucayali (to where it converges with the Amazon!) from Pucallpa to Iquitos, I spent several days in Iquitos which included a day at an animal orphanage in nearby Padre Cocha.

While there, I had a handful of primate encounters. Literally– a handful. Pixcetera’s collage inspired me to post some photos of my own primate encounters below.

The rare Uacaryi Monkey - A Thrill for me!

The rare Uacaryi Monkey - A Thrill for me!

A Saki Monkey

A Saki Monkey

Capuchin Monkey - Swinging his way to mischief!

Capuchin Monkey - Swinging his way to mischief!

Howler Monkey - Sleeping soundly!

Howler Monkey - Sleeping soundly... for now

This recent Gallup Poll might be telling us what we already know, but if the U.S. election were held in Europe today, Obama would win in an unprecedented landslide. Undoubtedly, most Americans could care less about what Europeans think; In fact, if anything many Americans probably react to Europe’s opinion by taking a knee-jerk, juvenile opposing opinion, just out of spite. It’s never been clear to me why being respected in the rest of the world is seen as a bad thing by a certain segment of the American populace. I would agree that the favorable opinions of foreigners shouldn’t sway our own opinions, at least not ultimately. But if any particular candidate is seen as significantly unfavorable, especially among our allies in other Western nations, it ought to be a legitimate cause for concern.

And there isn’t much room for ambiguity in these poll results. I mean, in France, only 4% of those polled would rather see John McCain as our next President. Only 4%! I think the only way to read this poll is to read it as a flat rejection of John McCain in Europe. The choice, for Europeans, is already startlingly obvious: Barack Obama is clearly the better candidate.

Meanwhile, millions of Americans will be heading to the polls in a couple of months literally torn between the two candidates. Most recent polls here in America show Obama and McCain neck and neck. I think it’s worth asking, then: Why does the choice seem so easy for Europeans, yet seem so strenuous for U.S. voters? Who is wearing the veil here– us or them?

One thing’s for sure: in Europe they aren’t limited by the American media. The American media has become so nationalistic that it’s nearly impossibly to watch a newscast on cable news, such as on FOX, MSNBC or CNN, without seeing a video animation of an American flag waving in the background. It’s as if the media is utterly terrified of being viewed as anti-American. As a result, most Americans are oblivious to the vast harm the neo-conservative agenda has caused this country and our relationships with the rest of the world. The American media, with its rose, white & blue-colored glasses, just doesn’t report what the rest of the world plainly sees.

It certainly doesn’t hurt their credibility that Europeans (certainly the ones listed in this poll!) have significantly better transportation infrastructures, health care systems, standards of living, educational systems, life expectancy, and stronger currencies. Sure, Europe has its problems too, but I think it’s time to be honest with ourselves and ask: WWED? (What Would Europeans Do?)

Because “more of the same” just isn’t working here in America.


It’s become eerily consistent: it seems the only times the Bush Administration and our media really cares about democracy, liberty and independence in the world is when there’s a lot of oil at stake. While Bush is parading around as a noble crusader for democracy, backing Georgia and hypocritically attempting to lecture Russia about the wrongs of invasion, it doesn’t hurt that Georgia also has a major oil pipeline running through it. The pipeline, which was completed in 2005, is one of the West’s latest attempts to secure its interest in the massive Caspian oil reserves, which diversifies the West’s supply of foreign oil outside of the Middle East. Also worthy of note is that the pipeline, which is controlled by BP, also shares its investment with the likes of Chevron and ConocoPhillips, as well as Norwegian, French and Italian oil giants.

Interestingly, it has been massively under-reported thus far that this conflict began, not due to a Russian invasion, but rather due to a Georgian invasion of one of its territories: South Ossetia, which is not an ethnically Georgian region and has been interested in its own independence from Georgia. While South Ossetia’s rebel forces have been fueled by Russian support– support which had recently been advanced and accelerated– undoubtedly Russia’s support for the region has more to due with the oil pipeline too, and less to do with noble protection of a region’s independence.

Thus, this is the real reason for why the U.S. and Europe are picking Georgia’s side and painting Russia as the invading force: it can only truly be about controlling that Caspian oil supply.